Getting Terraform Provisioning Parameters from the Packet.net API

Provisioning on Packet.net is super easy using Terraform. One of the tricks you will need to know up front is that for Terraform and for many other provisioning tools, you need to provide a minimum set of parameters to launch.

As a minimum, you need to provide these following parameters as shown in the Terraform docs for the Packet provisioner:

  • hostname – gotta name ’em all
  • project_id – you need to know, or create the project to launch into
  • facility – which location are you deploying into? (EWR1, SJC1, etc.)
  • plan – which node type?
  • billing_cycle – hourly or monthly
  • operating_system – which OS will the node run?

Some are simple to use because they are your criteria. We choose the hostname, and we choose the billing cycle as either a static choice of hourly or monthly. How can we get the other details about our deployment? You can gather some data using a browser such as browsing to your project and then pulling the project ID from the URL. That still leaves us in search of the plan type, operating_system, and facility.

For completeness, let’s learn how to simply gather all four items (operating system list, project ID, plan types, facility) from the Packet.net API.

You’ll need a terminal session, your API key to query the Packet.net API, and the JQ tool for parsing out JSON results into something a little more friendly.

Querying the API is as easy as sending your token to the API using the cURL command and selecting which entities you want to query. This is the basic framework:

curl -s -X GET -H 'X-Auth-Token: YOURAPITOKEN' 'https://api.packet.net/OBJECT'

Now we can dig into the four easy examples we have.

Finding the Packet.net Facility Name

The simple one-liner will pull a JSON result that gives you the locations and subsequent Facility name that you can use and then parses out just the location codes to use. If you remove the '.facilities[].code' portion of the command it will show you the full pretty-printed JSON results including the full facility descriptions.

curl -s -X GET -H 'X-Auth-Token: YOURAPITOKEN' 'https://api.packet.net/facilities' | jq '.facilities[].code'

Finding the Packet.net Project ID

You’ll want the full JSON result so you can choose from your active projects if you have more than one. Just drill into the JSON results and you can locate the id field:

curl -s -X GET -H 'X-Auth-Token: YOURAPITOKEN' 'https://api.packet.net/projects' | jq

Finding the Packet.net Plan Names

Plans don’t shift around too much, just like facilities. Here is the simple query to get all the plan names and match them to what node type you want to use:

curl -s -X GET -H 'X-Auth-Token: YOURAPITOKEN' 'https://api.packet.net/plans' | jq '.plans[].slug'

Finding the Packet.net Operating System Types

By now, you can guess where we are going wth the next one. Query the API, parse out the results, and provide the slugs for the Operating System names which we will use for Terraform and other provisioning tools which consume the Packet API.

curl -s -X GET -H 'X-Auth-Token: YOURAPITOKEN' 'https://api.packet.net/operating-systems' | jq '.operating_systems[].slug'

The result will give you all of the slug names that are usable as the operating_system parameter. In the case of vSphere 6.5, it happens to be vmware_esxi_6_5 which may not have been obvious if you were to try guessing it out.

Now you can take those easy JSON results and feed them into a Terraform file or you may also use these raw queries as part of other configuration management and provisioning solutions. Hope you find this helpful!

Also, you can sign up for Packet.net to kick the tires on this goodness and you can use VDM25 as a referral code to get a 25$ credit to use. Make sure you tell them DiscoPosse and the Virtual Design Master crew sent you!




Setting up Turbonomic Action Notifications to Slack Channels

An interesting use-case that I’ve bumped into lately is where folks want to enable automation, but they also need to know when automated things happen. Email was the common platform for notifications, and still is, but there are many more organizations adoption Slack for day-to-day activity monitoring and building out interesting interactive ways to enable the ChatOps approach to IT operations management.

Since you may have followed along my first article which showed you how to set up a custom WebHook integration for your Slack team channel, we will take that one step further and show you how to configure Turbonomic to send notifications of actions to your Slack channel.

Setting up Action Scripts in Turbonomic

One of the cool features within Turbonomic is something called Action Scripts. These are scripts that are run when a particular actions happens on a particular entity within the environment. Action scripts run at different times in the process including before (PRE) and after (POST) the action so that you can either get notification or to trigger some interaction with the action.

Action Scripts run for every action time available including moves, scale/resize, and more. The naming of each Action Script is relative to the timing (PRE/POST) and the action type. You only need to create one Action Script which is hosted on your Turbonomic control instance and launched by the Turbonomic engine as actions are triggered.

The official documentation on using Action Scripts is here, but for our purposes here I will give you a crash course in creating a PRE move script so that we can send Slack notifications when an application workload is about to move.

Variables Accessible during Action Script Execution

There are a number of environment variables which are generated when a Turbonomic action is instantiated. Some of these include:

$VMT_TARGET_NAME – the entity which is subject to the move action
$VMT_CURRENT_NAME – the source location where the entity is located
$VMT_NEW_NAME – the destination where the entity will be moved
$VMT_ACTION_NAME – the unique ID for the action

These are the ones that I’ve chosen to include for my Slack notifications because I will want to know the workload which is subject to the move, the source location, target location, and then having the ID of the action is helpful for auditing and also for more deeper integration with a true ChatOps approach that we will dive into further in another post.

For now, the Slack notifications will be simply to log for us using our Slack channel whenever there are moves occurring. You can select from any of the different actions in the Action Scripts, so this is a good place to start.

The PRE_MOVE_VirtualMachine.sh Script

The simplest view of the script is as follows. Simply create a file named PRE_MOVE_VirtualMachine.sh which is the one that is called by a move action. This could be anything from a VM migration across hosts, clusters, or also container pod changes and more.

We need to leverage the action variables that we have been given and pass them into the our Slack API call. The simplest method for this is to inject a cURL command into the Action Script that will run using the native cURL command available on your Turbonomic instance.

The command to post to the API for Slack requires your WebHook URL which you can get by following this guide that helps you get the WebHook set up.

This is the full GitHub Gist of the code. If you have existing Action Scripts in the folder, you can simply append these lines to your existing script.

Take note of the use of quotes within the command line as we need to pass the variables into the cURL command which requires additional double-quotes around the entire command.

Last step – Enable Action Script for Moves in Turbonomic

At the time of this writing, the Action Scripts features are still in the traditional flash UI. Go to the Policy view in your Turbonomic instance and expand the Action | VM section where we will enable the Action Scripts for Virtual Machines in this case.

Simply check off the Action Script Settings setting for the PreMove action and you are all set. In the image above we can see that I also have Move actions automated which may be set to Manual for your environment.

NOTE: Enabling policy changes within Turbonomic will trigger a refresh of the actions. This is because the state of your policies has changed and the entities in the environment must shop for the appropriate resources to satisfy their demand based on the newly formed policy configuration. This is the nature of the system being real-time so that no actions are held when they could be stale or unnecessary due to other environmental changes that have occurred.

The Slack View

Under your Slack channel, you will now begin seeing notifications whenever an action occurs. This is what your channel will start to look like as the moves take place:

In my case, I have enabled full automation; This means that these actions are triggered and the notification is done as the action is about to occur. We can also do POST_MOVE script which is handy if we are building out other hooks.

The goal with Action Scripts is to be able to integrate with any application lifecycle management process or product.  Look for much more in the coming weeks as we walk through some more integrations that can be done with this method.




Why Google Needs Consistency for Enterprise Cloud Customers

Remember Google Buzz? Orkut? Wave? Reader? Google Talk? Then there was Google Picasa…which became photos…so far. There are sites dedicated to what we call the Google Graveyard. This doesn’t even get into the Google Glass, Site Search, Search Appliance and others. I logged into my Google Analytics platform today and found it to be a completely different UI and UX than I have ever seen before…without warning. I used to use Google Hangouts On Air for the Virtual Design Master event every year until this year when HOA no longer works, so I have had to move to using Zoom and pushing to a Youtube Live Event.

The reason that I bring these up is that we have an optics problem with Google which may affect how many potential enterprise cloud customers choose to adopt, or rather to not adopt, Google Cloud Platform. One of the big things that traditional enterprise customers enjoy is the warm embrace of platforms that have consistency. Google has tended to have some challenges around product changes and the public face of those changes. Google most likely has lots of data backing the decision to shift or sunset a product.

Can GCP make Enterprises Greene with Envy?

Diane Greene has come over to Google by way of her most recent startup Bebop being acquired. It’s my opinion that the startup was the packaging in which they could acquire the real value, which is Diane herself. Diane has a proven past success in launching a little virtualization concept into the juggernaut that became VMware. The most recent Google Cloud Next event featured a strong presence of a new focus on the enterprise with an aim to become the number 1 public cloud provider within five years.

A quote that stood out from the event was “I actually think we have a huge advantage in our data centers, in our infrastructure, availability, security and how we automate things. We just haven’t packaged it up perfectly yet.” which highlights the challenge that Google will face. The need for many enterprises is a packaged and neatly consumable product that we know we can adopt and maintain with long support plans and clean deprecation.

There is little doubt of the ability of Google to develop incredible products which will give birth to next-generation application infrastructure that few can rival. The only doubt comes around whether enterprise audiences are going to be ready to adapt to the speed at which Google innovates their product set. If Kubernetes is any sign of how well we are leaning in, then it is very easy to see that Google can take the market on and win a significant share.

Google Cloud Platform will be a juggernaut in the public cloud realm. That is a fact which is being proven out by some major customers moving into the platform already and many more dabbling. Multi-cloud is the new cloud, so GCP will inevitably become a key player in that strategy because of it’s underlying GKE product to support Kubernetes workloads. In my opinion, the multi-cloud approach enabled by containerized workloads with an enterprise-grade scheduler is going to become the goal we should strive for.

The only question is how long it will take before we can all put our trust in one product that Google has lacked in, which is consistency.




MSPOG – Accepting the Reality of Multiple Single Panes of Glass

You probably dread the phrase as much as I do. We hear it all the time on a sales call or a product demo: “this is the single pane of glass for you and your team”. The problem is that I’ve been working in the industry a long time and have been using a lot of single panes of glass…at the same time. Many of my presentations have been centered around the idea that we must embrace the right tool for the right task, and not try to force everything through one proverbial funnel because the reality is that we cannot do everything with any single product.

For this reason, it’s time to embrace MSPOG: Multiple Single Panes of Glass

Many Tools, Many Tasks, One Approach

Using a unified approach to something is far more important than the requirement to using a single product to do it. I’m not saying that you should just willy nilly glue together dozens of products and accept it. What I am saying is that we have to dig into the core requirements of any task that we performa and think about things in a very Theory of Constraints (ToC) way. Before we even dive into some use-cases, think about what we are taught as architects: use the requirements to define the conceptual, logical, and then physical solution. All the while, understanding and making our decisions based on risks and constraints.

If you have a process that requires two or three different processes within it, you may be able to use a single tool for those processes. What if one of the processes is best solved with a different tool? This becomes the question of the requirements. Is it a risk if we embrace a second tool? More importantly, is it a risk or a constraint to use a single tool? This is the big question we should be asking ourselves continuously.

Imagine a virtual machine lifecycle process. We need to spawn the VM from a template, give it a network address, deploy an application into it, and then make sure it is continuously managed by a patch management and configuration management system. I know that you’re already evaluating how we should do this at the physical level by saying “use Ansible!” or “use Puppet!” or “use vRealize Automation!”. Stop and think about what the process is from end-to-end.

Our constraints on this is that we are using a VMware vSphere 6.5 hypervisor, a Windows 2016 guest, and using NGINX and a Ruby on Rails application within the guest.

  1. Deploy a VM from template – You can do this with any number of tools. Choose one and think about how we move forward from here
  2. Define IP address – We can use vRO, vRA, Puppet, Chef, or any of a number of tools. You can also even do some rudimentary PowerCLI or other automation once the machine is up and running
  3. Deploy your application – App deployment can be done with something like Chef, Puppet, or Ansible, as well as the native vRO and vRA with some care and feeding
  4. Patch management – Now we get more narrow. Most likely, you are going to want to use SCCM for this one, so this is definitely bringing another pane of glass in
  5. Configuration management – Provided you use SCCM because of the Windows environment, you can use that as well for configuration management…but what about the nested applications and configurations such as websites and other deeper node-specific stuff. Argh!!!

Even if you came out of the bottom of those 5 steps with just two tools, I would be thinking you may need to reevaluate because you have have overshot on the capabilities of those two tools. It is easy to see that if we start narrowing to a single pane of glass approach, that we are now jamming square blocks into round holes just to satisfy our supposed need to use a single product.

What we do need to do look for the platforms within that subset of options that has the widest and deepest set of capabilities to ensure we aren’t stacking up too many products to achieve our overall goals.

The solution: Heads up Display for your Single Pane of Glass

Automate the background and display in the foreground. We need to think more about having the proverbial single pane of glass be a visible layer on top of the real-time activity that is happening. Make your toolkit a fully-featured solution together with focus on how you can do as much as possible within each product. Also, reevaluate regularly. I can’t even count how many times i’ve been caught out by using something a specific way, only to find out that in a later version that the functionality was extended and I was using a less-desirable method, or even a deprecated method.

There is a reason that we have a mainframe at the centre of many large infrastructure shops. You wouldn’t tell them to shed their mainframe just to deploy all their data on NoSQL, right? That would be lunacy. Let’s embrace our Multiple Single Panes of Glass and learn to create better summary screens to annotate the activity. This way we also train ourselves to automate under the covers and trust the underlayers.

I, for one, welcome our Multiple Single Panes of Glass.

 

Image source:  https://hudwayglass.com



Why your Security Products are Inherently Insecure

You’re being sold snake oil every day in the world of IT. It is about time that we just lay this out honestly. The products that you are buying are not solutions. They are methodologies. Why does this semantic difference matter? It matters because we are blindly putting tools into place under the assumption that they are a solution to a problem. The truth is that they are merely tools in the fight to solve the problem.

Conceptual – Logical – Physical

Go back to the basics of systems architecture and infrastructure design for a moment. We view things in three stages of the design process as conceptual, logical, and physical. Conceptual design is thinking at a high level on the goal such as “the application servers will be protected from intrusion”. Moving to the logical physical version to expand on that concept would be something like “Layer 4-7 firewalls will be deployed at the ingress and egress point for the application servers”. Getting down to the physical is something like “Product X will be deployed to provide layer 4-7 firewall protection” which is the result of designing to meet the first two requirements.

The issue that we face as an industry is two-fold. First, we often start at “Product X will be deployed” without having done the due diligence on what the actual business and technical requirements are which need to be solved. The second issue is that we buy Product X, deploy Product X, and then everyone goes for a project completion dinner and celebrates that we have finished up the deployment with the bold assumption that we are inherently secure.

Many organizations are buying products or embracing some new technologies into their environments based on a promise. Promises should always bear translated to assumptions. I’ll start with one that I am seeing a lot of lately which is this:

“Containers are more secure for applications than virtual machines”

This is both true and false at the same time. The wording is important. What the phrase should say is “containers have the ability to be architected and deployed to be more secure for applications than traditional virtual machines”.

Here’s why phrasing is important.

Why is your security product inherently insecure?

You can’t buy a bow and arrow and suddenly you are an archer. The same goes for security. Just because you have bought a security product, it does not mean that you are secure. It’s actually the polar opposite. Your environment is inherently insecure. Even if you are absolutely sure that you are deployed in the most secure manner possible, you should ALWAYS ASSUME that you have been breached.

What’s the solution for this? This comes in three forms:

  1. Accept that you are insecure and build processes around that assumption
  2. Deploy and continuously test your security platforms
  3. Engage third-party testers and products to ensure continuous objective testing

Let’s dive into these three areas a little bit further.

Accept that you are insecure and build processes around that assumption

Point 1 is the key to begin with. Assume you have been breached. Now what? How are you aggregating your logs? How are you protecting the logging both locally on the application endpoints as well as in your central logging environments? If you have to assume that your ingress has been compromised, you also have to assume that your log environments have been compromised as well. You need local protection on each system plus centralized, read-only aggregation with regular snapshots of that environment to ensure its integrity too.

The build process you use will inevitably call on some external dependencies. It could be patches, software updates, or any of a wide variety of files and applications. Assume that these are inaccessible or compromised as you define your programmatic build process to use locally cached data and application dependencies as much as possible. And yes, the programmatic build process is key to ensuring consistency and security. You should include checksum and signature detection for all source files as you put them into the virtual application instances.

Deploy and continuously test your security platforms

Test-driven development is a great methodology. I have long been a user and a proponent of what is known as test-driven infrastructure and this includes the need for security as a part of the cycle. The only way that you know your detection system is working is if you test it when there is an issue. Assuming detection without truly testing the response means that you are relying on the assumption. Your CISO does not rely on assumptions, and neither do your customers.

Whichever products you embrace in your IT security portfolio, they will inevitably come with some form of baked in testing procedures and processes. Be aggressive and adamant with your vendors that this is a requirement for you. Nobody wants to be caught going back after a vulnerability to have to find out that it was detectable and preventable.

Engage third-party testers and products to ensure continuous objective testing

I hire someone to do my taxes. Yes, I can do them myself. That doesn’t mean that I’m an expert and can find every advantage within the tax code to get the best results. Why would I treat security and vulnerability testing any differently than any other discipline in my business and IT organization. Using 3rd party companies will give you the ability to lean on them for expertise, and most importantly, certification and validation of your security stance in an active environment.

Having spent years in financial services environments which have stringent requirements around auditing and security, I can tell you that no matter how secure even the IT security team thought they were, a 3rd party can come in and teach some rough lessons in a couple of hours.

Turn Assumptions into Actions

Going back to the example that containers are more secure than virtual machines gives us a great one to work from. Containers typically run thinner and provide a smaller attack surface for vulnerabilities, malware, and other attacks by bad actors. No, not Lorenzo Lamas, but anyone who is attempting to breach your environment. We will usually hear them being referred to as bad actors.

The truth is that containers as a construct, are solving deployment challenges first. Security is a secondary win that implies you have the practices in place to assure that security is greater than that of a traditional virtual machine. Containers are leveraging namespaces and other methods if isolation with the underlying server host to provide some potentially powerful protection. It does not mean that by default the container version of your application is more secure. It means that at the lowest possible layers, not including poor application code, SQL injection, XSS and many of a thousand different other attack vectors are solved by deploying in a container versus a traditional virtual machine.

The long and the short of it is that security products, or any technology products for that matter, are inherently insecure unless you deploy them with all of the practices in place around them to ensure the security.

This conversation on Twitter is a nice way to show how challenging it is to convey the message:




Using Terraform to Install DevStack on DigitalOcean

There are a few times where having a persistent OpenStack lab on a shared infrastructure is handy. I’ve been revisiting DevStack a lot more lately in order to help a few folks get their labs up and running. DevStack is the OpenStack project which lets you run non-production OpenStack using either a single or a multi-node configuration. Running on DigitalOcean means that I can have a lab that can spin up quickly (about 40 minutes) and also lets me find another handy use for Terraform.

NOTE: This uses an 80$/month DigitalOcean droplet, so please keep that in mind as you experiment.

Requirements for this are:

Getting the Code

All of the scripts and configuration are on GitHub for free use and are also open for contributions and updates if you see anything that you’re keen to add to. Remember that Terraform uses state files to manage your environment, so when you pull down the GitHub repo and launch your environment, it will create the .tfstate and .tfstatebackup files after you launch for the first time.

Grab the code using git clone https://github.com/discoposse/terraform-samples to bring it down locally:

Change directory into the /terraform-samples/DigitalOcean/devstack folder where we will be working:

Make sure you have the environment variables setup including the DigitalOcean API token, SSH key file locations, and your SSH fingerprint. These can be exported into your environment using a script or as one-off commands:

The process that is run by the code is to:

  • Pull the DigitalOcean environment needs (API and SSH info)
  • Launch an 8 GB RAM droplet in the NYC2 region and attach your SSH fingerprint
  • Insert the DevStack build script (files/devstack-install.sh) as a cloud-init script

Those are the pre-requirements. Now it’s time to get started!

Launching the DevStack Build on DigitalOcean with Terraform

It’s always good to use a health check flow of your Terraform builds. Start by validating, running the plan, and then launching. This ensures that you have a good environment configuration and the process should work smoothly.

terraform validate

No news is good news. The code validated fine and we are ready to run the terraform plan command to see what will transpire when we launch the build:

We can see a single droplet will be created because we have nothing to start with. There are a number of parameters that are dynamic and will be populated when the environment launches. Time to go for it!

terraform apply

This is where you need a little bit of patience. The build takes approximately 45-60 minutes. We know the IP address of the environment because we requested it via the Terraform outputs. You can confirm this at any time by running the terraform output command:

Checking the DevStack Install Progress using the Cloud-Init Log

Let’s connect via SSH to our DigitalOcean droplet so we can monitor the build progress. We use the build script as a cloud-init script so that it launches as root during the deployment. This means you can keep track of the results using the /var/log/cloud-init.log and the /var/log/cloud-init-output.log files.

Install completion is indicated by a set of log results like this:

Let’s try it out to confirm using the OpenStack Horizon dashboard URL as indicated in the cloud-init output. There are two accounts created by the script which are admin and demo, both of which have secret-do as the default password.

NOTE: Please change your OpenStack passwords right away! These are simple, plain-text passwords that are packaged with the build and you are vulnerable to attack

That gets us up and running. You are incurring charges as long as the environment is up, so when you’re ready to bring the environment down and destroy the droplet, it’s as easy as it was to launch it.

Destroying the DevStack DigitalOcean Build Using Terraform Destroy

In just two quick words and a confirmation we can remove all of the environment: terraform destroy

Just like that we have installed an all-in-one OpenStack DevStack node on DigitalOcean and learned another nifty way to leverage Hashicorp Terraform to do it.